Museum Closure

The Museum will close at 2 pm on Sunday, Jan. 26. We will reopen on Tuesday, Jan. 28, at 10 am.

Tankard

Object Number: 
1956.196
Date: 
ca. 1760
Medium: 
Silver
Dimensions: 
Overall: 8 7/8 x 5 1/2 x 9 1/8 in. ( 22.5 x 14 x 23.2 cm ) Part (lip): 4 7/8 in. (12.4 cm) Part (base): 5 1/2 in. (1
Marks: 
Stamp: Maker's mark "A S" in block letters in rectangle stamped twice in relief on bottom. Engraving: Arms attributed to Verplanck family in simple neoclassical shield engraved with motto at center right side of body.
Description: 
Wrought silver tankard; baluster-shaped body with a molded, flared lip on a molded, circular foot; stepped, flat cover with a serrated flange at the front; scrolled thumbpiece and molded hinge-plate with a broad molded drop and a small bead drop; double-scroll handle with a rat-tail terminal; applied, triangular spout with a beaded pendent at the base; Verplanck family coat-of-arms engraved on the center side, shield with a black-sable chief with three silver stars across above an ermine covered base, shield surmounted by a rampant dog, banner bellow engraved, "UT . VITA . SIC . MORS" in block letters; maker's mark stamped twice on the base.
Gallery Label: 
This tankard, engraved with the Verplanck family coat of arms, was likely owned by Samuel Verplanck, Sr. (1739-1820), who married Judith Crommelin in 1761. It descended through the Verplanck family to great-great grandson John Bayard Rodgers Verplanck (1883-1955), whose widow donated it to the Society.
Credit Line: 
Gift of Mrs. Bayard Verplanck
Provenance: 
Probable descent: Samuel Verplanck, Sr. (1739-1820), who married Judith Crommelin in 1761; to their son Daniel Crommelin Verplanck (1762-1834), who married Ann Walton in 1790; to their son James Delancey Verplanck (1805-1881), who married Julia A. Gaverly in 1837; to their son Samuel Verplanck, Jr. (1840-1911), who married (second) Anna Schuchardt Rodgers (1839-1894) in 1880; to their son John Bayard Rodgers Verplanck (1883-1955), who married the donor, Susan Van Wyck Andrews, in 1911.
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.
Creative: Tronvig Group